Skin/Hair Care

Nutrition for Healthy Hair

Hair loss is one of the most common problems worldwide; everyone loses hundreds of hair stands each day.

According to scientists, even wrecked hair can be revived with a few sneaky little adjustments to your routine and nutrition.

When it comes to hair health, what you put in your body is just as important as what you put on your hair, and maintaining a healthy and balanced diet becomes crucial as soon as you notice hair fall.

Foods that are rich in Zinc, Iron, Vitamins A, B complex, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and proteins are vital and should be consumed. These foods go a long way in curbing hair fall as more often than not, hair fall is directly related to a vitamin/mineral deficiency.

A healthy diet will also help keep your hair moisturized and nourished. This will lead to lesser hair fall, fewer split ends, and curbed breakage.

Consider adding more of these to your diet :

  • carrots,
  • oats,
  • whole grains,
  • brown rice,
  • green leafy vegetables,
  • citrus fruits,
  • lentils,
  • sweet potatoes,
  • pumpkin seeds,
  • oysters,
  • nuts such as walnuts and almonds,
  • flaxseed oil (Linseed oil) or ground flaxseeds,
  • seafood like salmon and tuna that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids,
  • Eggs, beans, yogurt, and low-fat cheese.

Read: Rules To Prevent Hair Loss


Furthermore, increased intake of fruits and vegetables, and most importantly, water is bound to help prevent hair loss and result in healthier hair.

Avoid fatty foods and bubbly drinks while also cutting down on your intake of white carbs.

A protein-rich diet is needed for increased hair growth, and a diet which is high in Vitamin E and Omega 3, as well as Omega 6 fatty acids, can promote hair health.

Do not forget to drink plenty of water throughout the day to flush out all the harmful toxins from your body, and if you’re looking to improve your hair, evaluate your eating habits to see what might be lacking. Also, seek the advice of a nutritionist, as that can also help.

Protein

The hair’s structure is made of hardened proteins called keratin, and when your protein stores are low, generation of this important building block slows and hair grows slower and weaker.

Biotin

Biotin is a nutrient that has been shown to promote hair growth, and when biotin interacts with cell enzymes, it helps produce amino acids. Researchers have even found that lack or too little biotin can lead to hair loss. Lentils are a good source of biotin, as well as carrots, almonds, walnuts, and cauliflower, which are other smart choices to consider.

Iron

Your hair follicles receive nourishing oxygen from the iron in your red blood cells, and when the level of iron in your blood have low ferritin (the “bank” of iron your body keeps to draw on when it needs it), slow or halted hair growth, as well as shedding results.

Do your best to avoid this by eating iron-rich foods, such as oysters, clams, lean beef, eggs, tuna, soybeans, spinach, tofu, and garbanzo beans, and be sure to have your ferritin levels tested before considering a supplement.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Getting enough Omega-3s essential fatty acids can help prevent dry scalp and help your hair grow and shine, as these nutrients are found in the cell membranes of your scalp’s skin, and in the natural oils, your scalp and hair produces, in order to stay hydrated.

Eating wild salmon and other fatty fish like striped sea bass or mackerel will ensure a healthy dose of omega-3s. you can also incorporate some plant-derived sources into your diet, like flax seeds, walnuts, soybeans, and canola oil.
Finally, while your locks are made primarily of protein, they’re also made of water and need to maintain their moisture to avoid dryness and breakage. Make sure you’re replenishing yourself by drinking plenty of water each day, in addition to turning to a leave-in conditioner or other hydrating products to soften strands.

Eating water-rich fruits and vegetables helps hydrate your locks as well.

 

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