Women's Health

Why You Get Sore Vagina After Sex

The lady parts are no strangers to unwanted, uncomfortable issues, and they’re not immune to injuries, like bumps, bruises, scrapes, and tear either.

Vaginal dryness can make for painful intercourse, but it’s also the most common cause of post-sex soreness or pain. Long or energetic lovemaking session cause more friction if you’re not lubed and this can manifest later as soreness

Sufficient arousal can prevent the pain, as you’ll have more moisture down there, and your vagina also becomes more elastic as your excitement grows. This means that it can better accommodate a well-endowed partner or vigorous position.

While many people enjoy rough sex that causes some level of discomfort, under most circumstances, your vagina isn’t supposed to hurt during or after intercourse, and if an intense romp has you swinging back and forth, you should probably have a conversation with your partner or your gynecologist or both.

Sometimes sex does hurt, sometimes the intercourse you’re having is painful, and some other times your vagina is sore afterward. This doesn’t mean you need to feel ashamed or dysfunctional, but neither should you have to put up with painful sex for the rest of your life.

Reasons for Soreness After Sex

There are plenty of reasons why you might be experiencing pain or soreness after intercourse, they include:

There wasn’t enough lubrication

One of the most common causes of pain during or after intercourse is inadequate lubrication, and there are plenty of reasons why. Such reasons might include age, birth control, and some medications, just to name a few.

When your vagina isn’t properly lubricated during sex, the friction can cause tiny tears in your skin, which don’t feel great, and can make you more prone to infection.

Hormone changes and medications like birth control pills or antihistamines can also dry you up, and in these cases, natural personal lubricants, like ‘Restore by Good Clean Love’, can help treat dryness.

Furthermore, if you may notice that your pain occurs only after using certain hygiene products (like scented cleansers), condoms, or spermicides, which may cause irritation.

And an ache that’s deep in your pelvis could signify a cyst, a fibroid, or endometriosis, but in general, pain lasting longer than 24 hours with after-sex bleeding, unusual discharge, or odor is abnormal, and you should call for a gynecologist visit.

In order to feel better, put a little lube in your vagina, even after sex as it can actually have a soothing effect. That said, you’ll want to stay away from any lubricant with alcohol in it, ensuring to check the ingredients carefully to make sure your attempts to soothe won’t end up stinging the tears in your skin.

For starters, make sure you’re taking enough time for foreplay and using sufficient amounts of lube, as these are easy steps to take to give your vagina a chance to produce more natural lubrication.

There are plenty of reasons why you might not be producing a lot of natural lubrication, and your gynecologist can help you figure out what your options are.


Read: Facts Every Woman Must Know About Her Vagina


You partner is well-endowed.

If your partner’s penis, hands, or the dildo they’re using is quite big, it might actually be hitting your cervix during penetration, and that does not feel great. This pain might actually feel like menstrual cramps.

How to feel better is to take a warm bath, heating pad, or over-the-counter pain reliever. All of these things have anti-inflammatory effects, which can relieve some of the pain. In addition, if it takes too long for the pain to subside, talk to your doctor.

Foreplay is a great first step, as the vagina expands (becoming larger, longer, and wider) during foreplay, which allows for deeper, more comfortable penetration. Foreplay also increases lubrication, which will make penetration a little easier.

Also, be thoughtful about your positioning, since any position that puts the vagina owner in control of the penetration is a safe bet.

Rough or super fast sex

Friction can be great during sex, but too much friction can cause some serious discomfort because it means there’s probably not enough lubrication.

Take whatever steps you can to ensure adequate lubrication, and, as already mentioned, foreplay is a great way to give the vagina time to warm up, and lube helps, too.

It’s also important to start gently and slowly, and then transition into rougher, faster sex if that’s your flavor.

You’re sensitive to latex

Some people are allergic (or sensitive) to latex, and if such people have been using latex condoms, they might end up irritating their vagina,

Talk to your gynecologist to confirm your suspicion that you’re allergic or sensitive to latex, and if you are, avoid latex condoms in the future. That doesn’t mean giving up on condoms altogether, as there are plenty of alternatives, like polyurethane condoms, that you can still use to prevent STIs and pregnancy.

You have an infection

If you’re experiencing discomfort that goes beyond slight soreness, like itching, burning or abnormal discharge, then you might have an infection like a yeast infection, bacterial vaginosis, or something else entirely, and the best course of action is talking to your gynecologist.

Preventive methods are going to vary a lot depending on the kind of infection, and you can talk to your gynecologist to get their specific advice on what steps you can take.

Similarly, if you’re experiencing persistent pain during or after intercourse, you may have a medical condition, like endometriosis or uterine fibroids, and if that’s the case, you’ll definitely want to talk to your gynecologist.


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How To Heal A Sore Vagina After Rough Sex

Luckily, there are ways you can heal a sore vagina after a rough session between the sheets. It ranges from a warm bath to Kegels.

Warm bath

Taking a warm bath is not only incredibly relaxing; it also helps to soothe your lady’s area after having lots and lots of sex. Add baking soda as this immediately soothes the area, and then put coconut oil on for the rest of the day. If you’re at home, ditch undies and wear loose cotton pants.

Kegels

Your body is made up of muscle, and your vagina is no exception. Kegels are the most important exercise a woman can do to protect, tone and strengthen her pelvic floor muscle. Furthermore, Kegels are also crucial to a healthy pregnancy, childbirth, and postpartum recovery.

Compress

Soak a compress in cool or lukewarm water and then apply it to the affected area. Do not use hot water, since applying scorching hot water down below is as painful as it sounds.

Lubricant

Prior to intercourse, make sure that you’re fully lubricated, either naturally, or artificially. When there isn’t enough lubrication, engaging in dry or rough sex can cause vaginal tears, which leads to pain and soreness.

Apply ice and use over the counter antihistamines

You may want to sit in cool water and apply ice on the affected area while giving the area rest for a couple of days. You can also use over the counter antihistamines to avoid itching or topical anesthetics to numb the area. Aloe vera and coconut oil can also help to soothe this sensitive skin.

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